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Over Forty And Fashionable

#1 User is offline   Pauline

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Post icon  Posted 22 February 2005 - 07:45 AM

How do you think manufacturerers are coping with providing suitable and youthful enough fashion for women over 40?

Many women over 40 and 50 are in great shape whilst many too find it harder to keep a youthful figure, but all need accommodating with fashionable clothes for their needs.

Do you feel your fashion needs are being met by current fashion trends you see when out shopping?

Where are you shopping these days and what brands, designers or high street shops are you supporting?

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#2 User is offline   recluse

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Posted 25 February 2005 - 04:18 PM

Pauline, I know a few mid-life women who are in great shape and fashionable. I also think the manufacturers realize this significant demographic and is more than willing to supply them. Look at how the plus size market has evolved.

There is this dress shop near one of the places I like to eat lunch. Going by there will almost always find well dressed clients going in and out, many of them are 40's.

And (*GASP*) there is even a trend where women keep their long hair past the age of 40! Why not stay fashionable, too?
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#3 User is offline   Melody&Lime

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Posted 25 February 2005 - 04:48 PM

I was looking at an advert last night (the one where the mums daughter asks her why she isnt wearing her glasses)I was looking at the mum who looked in her mid 40's thinking how nicely dressed she was.
There seems to be a dress code which is great and can span at least 20 years.
The basics,flattering trousers/skirt,killer boots/shoes, plain top and jacket with complementary accessories.
I reckon all these work for women from 25 to 60.
Programmes like What not to wear and 10 years younger can be so helpful and I think it is filtering through to the public to buy key pieces.
If they are worn in a range of the same shade (dont where black with a colour)with some kind of jewellery/scarf that you can choose from the huge range available then i think the older woman can look great.

If youve got it,flaunt it, at any age.

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#4 User is offline   blueprairie

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Posted 25 February 2005 - 10:05 PM

QUOTE(Melody&Lime @ Feb 25 2005, 11:48 AM)
If youve got it,flaunt it, at any age.
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True; as long as you aren't selling mutton dressed as lamb!

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#5 User is offline   prabh

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Posted 26 February 2005 - 07:11 AM

I FEEL THIS AGE GROUP HAS EVOLVED IN TERMS OF THE DESIGNS...CLRS...AND STYLES THEY CHOOSE...
I AM HANDLING A BRAND WHICH SPECIFICALLY CATERS TO THIS AGE GROUP. OVER THE YEARS WE HAVE CHANGED THE LOOK OF THE BRAND COMPELETELY BASED ON THE CHANGING TASTES & PERFERENCES OF THE CUSTOMER.

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#6 User is offline   Pauline

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Posted 26 February 2005 - 11:27 AM

QUOTE(prabh @ Feb 26 2005, 07:11 AM)
....OVER THE YEARS WE HAVE CHANGED THE LOOK OF THE BRAND COMPELETELY BASED ON THE CHANGING TASTES & PERFERENCES OF THE CUSTOMER.
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Well it's good to know that manufacterers are attempting to address this age group.

By the way on the internet and in emails, posts with capitals are considered to be shouting at readers so please use lower case next time.
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#7 User is offline   Pauline

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Posted 26 February 2005 - 11:48 AM

QUOTE(blueprairie @ Feb 25 2005, 10:05 PM)
True; as long as you aren't selling mutton dressed as lamb! wink.gif
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I think this is a dilemma for anyone over 40 or 50. At what point do you decide that a look or garment is a no no.

Re Melody's comment about Susannah and Trinny's show - it seems to me that some people just don't have a cheval or full length mirror and if they do have one, they just don't look at themselves when they dress. Nor do the same inidividuals use a hand mirror to check their side or rear view which may be less than perfect, but can sometimes be improved once you know the back view shows pulling. A woman should always have a small mirror in her bag when clothes shopping just in case the mirror arrangement is poor in a shop. 3 way mirrors are grim, but they can help real wardrobe mistakes happening.

Another thing some women don't do is cull their wardrobe every so often. I think the older you get the more often you need to check does this item flatter me, would it look better on someone younger.

Recluse I'm interested in your comment about long hair. That used to be the idea - over 40 and you don't have longer hair. Out shopping the other day I noticed that every woman in the coffee shop was well over 40 and certainly almost all with well cut or bobbed or mid length hair. I'm pleased to say very few had what I think of as stiff helmet hairdos which really do age women as they are now mostly seen on over 75s.
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#8 User is offline   recluse

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Posted 08 March 2005 - 11:40 PM

QUOTE(Pauline @ Feb 26 2005, 06:48 AM)
Recluse I'm interested in your comment about long hair. That used to be the idea - over 40 and you don't have longer hair.  Out shopping the other day I noticed that every woman in the coffee shop was well over 40 and certainly almost all with well cut or bobbed or mid length hair. I'm pleased to say very few had what I think of as stiff helmet hairdos which really do age women as they are now mostly seen on over 75s.
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I'm actually refering to longer lengths, like mid back or to the waist. I'm seeing this trend more and more.

Possibilities?
1. Many of this age group came of age in the late 60's or 70's. Long hair then was the norm. Some of them have never went short. My wife is of this catagory.
2. The different styles in which longer lengths can be worn. Also, many in this age group usually wear their longer hair up in elaborate styles with hair jewlery rather than their younger counterparts who usually go with long & loose.
3. In today's society, many of these women in this age group are single again due to the high divorce rate. Longer hair and stylish clothing makes them feel attractive.

I like this trend. There is no reason mid life women have to conform to black pants and helmet 'do's!
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#9 User is offline   Pauline

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 12:06 AM

My husband has been encouraging me for months to let mine grow longer. Frankly I want it cut. It's now at chin level and I reckon by the summer could look longish. But he looks at me with such eyes when I mention getting it bobbed again I feel I must give it a chance to grow it longer if only to then get it cut. I last had longer hair in my twenties, but I never liked that cut like I like this one. I've been really surprised by how many people I never expected to have said they like it longer.

Your words have made me think I'll stick with it a bit longer again.
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#10 User is offline   recluse

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Posted 12 March 2005 - 05:01 AM

QUOTE(Pauline @ Mar 8 2005, 07:06 PM)
I last had longer hair in my twenties, but  I never liked that cut like I like this one.  I've been really surprised by how many people I never expected to have said they like it longer.

Your words have made me think I'll stick with it a bit longer again.
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Hi again. I've chatted with a few mid life women who have had all different lengths of hair. To my surprise, many say the longer hair is EASIER to care for than shorter lengths (Up to a certain length around waist length). Others like the variety of styles which longer lengths may be worn. Many of them like long flowing skirts when wearing their locks down.

May I ask what you didn't like about your cut when it was longer? There is a middle length they say is difficult to get through, that being too long and in your face but not long enough to tie back.

About the comments you are receiving about your longer length, maybe you should give a longer length a shot. If you have the same concerns you had in your 20's where you didn't like the cut, you easily can go back to the cut you like.
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#11 User is offline   Pauline

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Post icon  Posted 12 March 2005 - 11:01 AM

<<May I ask what you didn't like about your cut when it was longer?>>

In my twenties I just decided to let the hair grow without having it cut. It was basically messier as it grew longer from layers is all I can say. Because it was layered it never had that weighty volume at the bottom that it does now which seems to look especially good from the back.

This time I took 6 months to grow it to a bob from very short and then in a year with regular trims it was a very good bob, consistently getting compliments. Now I have been having it minutely trimmed every 10 weeks. It's gaining length and because of growing it from a bob it seems to have remained looking good shape wise. I think it's now what is called mid length just below the jaw and I can just about put it up, but need more hair length to make it pretty rather than strained when up.

I think I look better with it shorter but my husband likes it very much and keeps saying so, my mother has also been very complimentary ( and she sjust come straight with me). It makes me feel younger - can't be bad. But the main thing is when we were in a nice restaurant yesterday, I noticed the women there were the same age group as me and not one had short hair so maybe that 'can't have long hair after 40' is a barrier women are now ignoring.

Thank you Recluse for the extra encouragement and re the easier aspect - in some ways it is easier to manage. Now when I get caught in the rain I don't panic about my hairdo collapsing as there is little to collapse heightwise.
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#12 User is offline   valerie

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Posted 23 March 2005 - 07:48 PM

I think that the over forties present a challenge to retailers. Many are aware of fashion and want to wear what is current now. Is it my imagination or, when I was growing up did women tend to stick with a modified version of whatever they felt comfortable with in their youth, after they reached a certain age, it was as if they "grew out" of fashion. I dont think we do that any longer, prefering not to be stereotyped, agewise by our clothes. There is however the aspect that pregnancy, childbirth and possibly menopause all act to change the shape of a womans body, so any retailer offering a good range of fits and sizes will get more customers. I tend to be quite undiscriminating, and would buy clothes from anywhere, if I like the look of the garment. I am quite fussy, though and sometimes can be put off buying something trendy if its in a cheap fabric. Marks and Spencer seem currently to be making improvements in catering for women of all ages. I like Monsoon and East, Wallis and Principles, but still wouldnt be particularly interested in places like Country Casuals, Viyella and Alexon, who I still see as catering for more mature women than me.(Come on Pauline, am I just in denial?)
BTW, I teach teenage girls and, although you would expect them to be the most fashion aware group what I notice is that they tend to wear a sort of "fashion uniform" (probably described elsewhere on the site) from which hardly any of them deviate. It is really funny to see their herd instinct when it comes to what they wear!
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#13 User is offline   Pauline

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Post icon  Posted 24 March 2005 - 08:57 PM

Hi Valerie, nice to see you online.

No I don't think you are in denial. Like you I like a mix of clothes, varying from expensive to just everyday prices. I like frivolous and girly as well as tailored and classic.

You are right about Viyella, Alexon and Country Casuals being rather on the dour side. They still haven't really moved out of the eighties, with all those prim jumpers and all displayed Sloane style with little collars peeking out of jumpers on the stands. It's all very safe and very dull and very middle aged and I just refuse to be that middle aged even if I am. In fact I do believe this winter I didn't see any Alexon anywhere and think they have moved the label sideways into a younger range trying to attract the over 35 market. I have to praise them though for their high quality winter coats in the past years that compare in quality with brands like Aquascutum and Max Mara for half or less than half the price. But again many people now just don't wear full length winter coats anymore.

I do like classic though and prefer the Alex and Co sub range they've added along with the Kaliko and Minuet range that Alexon also owns. I don't think you are in denial I just think we have to choose very very carefully from these ranges. I find the fit on Alex and Co really suits my figure. I have a more slender friend, but same height and she finds the same thing. I think they cater for women about 5'3'' to 5'5'' and know the British shape and get the shoulder fit correct. But you have to pick carefully. But I agree the Monsoon, East and Wallis stuff is just so much more appealing. Again I find Principles a poor fit on me so I think it really is a case of finding ranges that suit you. But it is nice. I also find Next a poor fit and have never bought much from there, but they both do so well obviously they must be fitting some people well.

I also wonder the age group Phase Eight and Hobbs are pitching at. I like Kew, Karen Millen and Zara, but find even though I'm in the size range, its cut for tiny girly bodies. By the time I find something in Zara that fits my middle the shoulders are falling off me.





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#14 User is offline   valerie

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Posted 24 March 2005 - 09:28 PM

[quote=Pauline,Mar 24 2005, 08:57 PM]
Hi Valerie, nice to see you online.

Just a quickie! Yes the Alex & co range is nice, and moving sideways, Ann Harvey is also one of Alexon`s labels, as you know, and this shows in the quality of their clothes. I was in Hobbs today, and although their colours and fabrics always look luscious to me, the clothes seemed to be for quite petite women, I am interested in what you say about the coats at Alexon, will give them a look in the autumn.
I should have added , last posting, that a significant factor for the over forties is that we have much more spending power than ever before, since so many of us are working, so retailers ignore us at their peril!

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#15 User is offline   Pauline

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Posted 24 March 2005 - 10:57 PM

[quote=valerie,Mar 24 2005, 09:28 PM]
[quote=Pauline,Mar 24 2005, 08:57 PM]
I should have added , last posting, that a significant factor for the over forties is that we have much more spending power than ever before, since so many of us are working, so retailers ignore us at their peril!
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[/quote]

Yes I agree with you.
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#16 User is offline   recluse

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Posted 26 March 2005 - 02:30 AM

QUOTE(valerie @ Mar 24 2005, 04:28 PM)
I should have added , last  posting, that a significant factor for the over forties is that we have much more spending power than ever before, since so many of us are working, so retailers ignore us at their peril!
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I may also add that this generation (Baby Boomers born '46 to '64) takes better care of themselves than any generation past.

Helping this is also the sheer numbers of them! Yes, you ignore this segment at your peril.
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#17 User is offline   Happy

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Posted 08 June 2009 - 03:53 AM

I think designers are marketing their clothes to all age groups. I see a lot of clothes for the 40 and up age range.



QUOTE (Pauline @ Feb 22 2005, 12:45 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
How do you think manufacturerers are coping with providing suitable and youthful enough fashion for women over 40?

Many women over 40 and 50 are in great shape whilst many too find it harder to keep a youthful figure, but all need accommodating with fashionable clothes for their needs.

Do you feel your fashion needs are being met by current fashion trends you see when out shopping?

Where are you shopping these days and what brands, designers or high street shops are you supporting?


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#18 User is offline   Sharon

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Posted 20 June 2009 - 02:40 PM

I believe classic style clothing if it's quality fabric, well-made and has a great shape looks wonderful on all ages. I prefer quality to quantity because it makes me feel so good! You can always accessorize an outfit with lots of bangles, earrings or long necklaces to change the style. I do prefer solid colors which I believe flatter most women except in T-shirts where stripes are fun. Now hairstyles do make a big difference. It's not particularly how long or short hair is or what age a person is but rather how it frames one's face. wink.gif
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#19 User is offline   Ben

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Posted 24 June 2009 - 02:53 AM

I did 40+ people clothing, but I found the market is not as big as youngers, that maybe why so hard to find 40+ age's fashion ------- because supplier prefer to make younger clothes, that's easier and that market is much bigger.

Mid-age customers are usually 'picksome', they do care the fabric and quantity (the cost would go high), while young girls may more care about the styles only. 40+ customers may not buy so many clothes a year, while the young girls in my office usually do shopping every week. ...

then I found the order for younges fashion are usually 10 thousand pcs ---- or even more, and my orders for 40+ ladies are.. several dozen only. So.... you see, do young fashion is making easy money.

The key is we may need someone who dare to explore this market, I feel.
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